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Diamondback Bicycles Overdrive Hardtail Mountain Bike with 27.5" Wheels, 18"/Medium, Red
Diamondback Bicycles Tess 24 Youth Girls 24" Wheel Mountain Bike, Blue
Diamondback Bicycles Micro Viper 12, Orange
Diamondback Bicycles Hook 27.5 Wheel Mountain Bike, Red, Medium
Diamondback Bicycles Line 27.5 Hardtail Mountan Bike, Blue, Medium
Title
Diamondback Bicycles Overdrive Hardtail Mountain Bike
Diamondback Bicycles Tess Youth Girls Mountain Bike
Diamondback Bicycles Jr Viper 20" Wheel Youth BMX Bike
Diamondback Bicycles Hook 27.5 Hardtail Mountain Bike
Diamondback Bikes Line Hardtail Mountain Bike
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Diamondback Bicycles
Diamondback Bicycles
Diamondback Bicycles
Diamondback Bicycles
Diamondback Bicycles
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Diamondback Bicycles Overdrive Hardtail Mountain Bike with 27.5" Wheels, 18"/Medium, Red
Title
Diamondback Bicycles Overdrive Hardtail Mountain Bike
Brand
Diamondback Bicycles
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Diamondback Bicycles Tess 24 Youth Girls 24" Wheel Mountain Bike, Blue
Title
Diamondback Bicycles Tess Youth Girls Mountain Bike
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Diamondback Bicycles
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Diamondback Bicycles Micro Viper 12, Orange
Title
Diamondback Bicycles Jr Viper 20" Wheel Youth BMX Bike
Brand
Diamondback Bicycles
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Diamondback Bicycles Hook 27.5 Wheel Mountain Bike, Red, Medium
Title
Diamondback Bicycles Hook 27.5 Hardtail Mountain Bike
Brand
Diamondback Bicycles
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Diamondback Bicycles Line 27.5 Hardtail Mountan Bike, Blue, Medium
Title
Diamondback Bikes Line Hardtail Mountain Bike
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Diamondback Bicycles
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Diamondback Mountain Bike Assembly

congratulations on purchasing your
Diamondback bike as you open the box
you’ll see there are just four steps to
get you riding if you’ve never built a
bike before this may take you up to
sixty minutes if you’re handy with tools
probably around 40 to 50 minutes
if you’ve wrenched a little before but
never fully built a bike expect around
30 to 40 minutes and if you’re an expert
mechanic
you’ll probably be riding in ten minutes
start by making sure you have everything
out of the box including the small parts
and tools box and the seat post with the
saddle attached take all the packaging
materials off the bike and be sure to
save them along with the box
for bikes with disc brakes the disc
protector can be tricky to take off but
simply tugging it straight off is the
best way to do it
try not to touch the disc rotor as oils
from your hands can later cause the
brake to be noisy now turn the fork
forward making sure the cables aren’t
twisted around the frame and hang the
fork over the edge of the bike box
remove the four bolts holding the
faceplate on then Center your handlebars
on the stem the cables should cleanly
cross in front of the bike begin
threading the bolts back into the
faceplate by hand then adjust your bars
so the brake levers sit at a 45 degree
angle do the final tightening of the
bolts with an Allen wrench and tighten
them in a crossing pattern checking to
make sure the bolts are equally tight
the wrench should leave an imprint on
your palm when they’re tight enough
and there should also be an equal gap
between the top and bottom of the
faceplate and stem
if you have a dropper post insert the
cylindrical cable clamp into the
actuator arm and then pull down on the
housing to see it into the seatpost base
slide the post into the frame making
sure to insert it past the
minimum-insertion mark
tighten the seat post collar firmly but
not too tight or the post may not work
properly if you have a regular seat post
open the quick-release and slide the
seat tube in make sure to insert it past
the minimum insertion line and close the
quick-release it should leave an imprint
on your palm when it’s tight enough to
install your front wheel it will
probably be easiest to turn your bike
upside down if your bike has a through
axle flip the handle open and unthread
it from the fork if there’s a plastic
spacer in your disc brake pull it out
too now insert your front wheel lining
the disc to slide between both pads of
the disc brake then push the thru axle
in and begin to tighten it clockwise
when you close the lever you should
encounter tension just about halfway
close and when fully closed the lever
will leave an imprint on your palm if
your bike has rim breaks look for a
direction arrow on the side of the tire
orient it the right way for bikes with a
quick-release first take the plastic
fork block out of the dropouts put the
front wheel in the fork and slide the
quick-release through the hub with one
conical spring on each side thread the
nut on to the other side and begin to
tighten when you close the lever it
should tuck up near the fork clay and
when it’s tight enough the lever will
leave an imprint on your palm
if you have v-brakes and are unfamiliar
with how to use them simply grasp the
silver brake noodle with one hand and
the hinged arm with the other guide the
brake noodle into the slot of the hinged
arm making sure it seats all the way in
slide the dust cover over and test the
brake to make sure the pads are
contacting the rim only your pedals are
right and left specific so make sure you
have the correct one for each side the
pedals are marked with R and L stickers
and some have an R or L stamped on the
end of the pedal spindle other pedals
will have a groove or other marking on
the spindle of the left pedal to install
them the right pedal goes on the same
side of the bike as the chain and
threads in clockwise whereas the left
pedal goes on the side without the chain
and threads in counterclockwise thread
them in carefully and give them a final
tightening with pedal wrench or an allen
wrench before you hit the trails do a
quick pre-ride check to make sure your
bike is in working order do a bolt check
on critical areas like the stem and
handlebars to make sure all the bolts
are still tight don’t over tighten them
just check to make sure they aren’t
loose next double check your quick
releases or through access then try to
spin your handlebars side to side while
holding the front wheel still with your
legs see if you can rotate the bars up
or down to now check both brakes pull
one brake lever at a time and rock your
bike back and forth five times then give
the wheels a spin there shouldn’t be any
rubbing of the brakes
on the sidewall of the tire there is a
suggested pressure rating keeping the
correct psi will lower your chances of
getting a flat and will make your ride
more efficient now check your saddle for
the correct height you want the top of
the saddle to be two to three inches
below your hip it’s also a good idea to
try to wiggle the saddle side-to-side
and if it doesn’t move it’s tight enough
to get the most out of your suspension
make sure your sag is set the way you
like it before you head for the trails
your suspension works best at 20 to 30
percent sag in the rear and around 15 to
25 percent in the front

SaleBestseller No. 1
Diamondback Bicycles Century 2, Road Bike, 52CM
  • Hand-built 7005 aluminum alloy frame with butted and formed tubing is light and highly durable
  • Spf air-formed disc alloy fork with tapered steered enhances handling performance
  • Tektro lyra disc brakes equal increased braking power and control
  • Wide-range Shimano Sora 2x9-speed drivetrain offers great performance and value
  • Diamondback Century folding-bead 700x28c tires

Last update on 2020-05-29 / Disclaimer: as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.