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Park Tool CCP-22 Bicycle Crank Puller – Square Taper, Power Spline, Bosch BNI, etc.
Park Tool CCP-44 Bicycle Crank Puller – Shimano Octalink, ISIS Drive
BW USA Bicycle Crank Puller – Crank Removal Tool for Mountain and Road Bikes with Square Taper Bottom Bracket Spindles
BIKE HAND - Bicycle Crank Puller – Crank Removal Tool for Mountain and Road Bikes with Square Taper Bottom Bracket and Splined ISIS Drive, Octalink
Bike Tools Kit for Crank Puller & Bike Pedal Double Wrench, Bottom Bracket Removal Tool, 2 Pcs Precision Purpose Auxiliary Wrench, Portable Emergency Accessories Kit
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Park Tool CCP-22 Bicycle Crank Puller
Park Tool CCP-44C ISIS/Octalink Crank Puller
BW USA Bicycle Crank Puller
BIKE HAND Bicycle Crank Puller
RidiTop Bike Tools Kit Set of 7, Crank Puller + Bottom Bracket Removal Tool + Flywheel Cassette Removal Tool
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Park Tool
Park Tool
BW
BIKE HAND
RidiTop
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$15.95
$15.95
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$9.99
Price not available
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Park Tool CCP-22 Bicycle Crank Puller – Square Taper, Power Spline, Bosch BNI, etc.
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Park Tool CCP-22 Bicycle Crank Puller
Brand
Park Tool
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$15.95
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Park Tool CCP-44 Bicycle Crank Puller – Shimano Octalink, ISIS Drive
Title
Park Tool CCP-44C ISIS/Octalink Crank Puller
Brand
Park Tool
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Price
$15.95
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BW USA Bicycle Crank Puller – Crank Removal Tool for Mountain and Road Bikes with Square Taper Bottom Bracket Spindles
Title
BW USA Bicycle Crank Puller
Brand
BW
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Price
Price not available
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BIKE HAND - Bicycle Crank Puller – Crank Removal Tool for Mountain and Road Bikes with Square Taper Bottom Bracket and Splined ISIS Drive, Octalink
Title
BIKE HAND Bicycle Crank Puller
Brand
BIKE HAND
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Price
$9.99
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Bike Tools Kit for Crank Puller & Bike Pedal Double Wrench, Bottom Bracket Removal Tool, 2 Pcs Precision Purpose Auxiliary Wrench, Portable Emergency Accessories Kit
Title
RidiTop Bike Tools Kit Set of 7, Crank Puller + Bottom Bracket Removal Tool + Flywheel Cassette Removal Tool
Brand
RidiTop
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Price
Price not available
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Three Piece Crankset

Hello, Calvin Jones here with Park Tool Company.
In this video we’re going to walk through the process of crank removal and installation for three piece cranks.
If you’re not sure what type of crank system you have, watch this other video
and you’ll be guided to the proper removal and installation process.
Otherwise, thanks for joining us and let’s begin.
First, before we get into the process, let’s give you an overview and a look at what goes on inside.
We’ve cut away part of the arm so you can see inside so we can follow the action.
We take the bolt and remove it counterclockwise. It’s going to come fully out.
What we can see here is that the arm is fitted over the spindle.
Now even though the bolt is out completely,
if we grab the arm it’s still not coming off – its still held tight to the spindle.
What’s required is a crank remover.
A crank remover has a threaded coupler that goes into the threads of the arm.
It’s fully engaged, and then the spindle driver is going to come in, contact this outer edge of the spindle.
We can see what’s going to happen if we continue to turn the spindle driver:
It’s going to take the arm and pull it away from the spindle
pushing against the spindle end, pulling with the arm, continuing until it comes fully off.
The tool is going to be removed from this arm and the process is reversed on the other side.
Arms going back on are fairly simple:
the crank bolt is going to go in place and it’s going to act as the press to push that arm back onto the spindle.
Here we are engaging and shoving the arm over the spindle. That is what holds are cracks to the bike.
Now we’ve seen that, we’re going to need a wrench that’s going to remove the crank bolt or nut,
a crank remover to extract the arm from the spindle,
we’re going to want lubrication and a rag for cleanup,
and a torque wrench is highly recommended for the high torques that we see in the three-piece cranks.
Crank arms are removed in order to replace them. They’re either worn out, damaged or maybe you’re upgrading.
You may want to service or replace the bottom bracket bearings between the arms.
It’s also easier to do a thorough cleaning when the crank arms are off the bike.
Step one is always to remove the crank bolt – but sometimes there’s a dust cap that’s in the way.
This one has a simple pressed-in dust cap.
A straight-bladed screwdriver pops out the dust cap and there is the crank bolt under it.
Sometimes it will be a threaded dust cap. In this case we take a pin spanner, loosen the dust cap,
turn it, and underneath the dust cap is the bolt.
However, there are also self extracting crank systems.
Here – do not remove this ring, it is not a dust cap.
The self-extracting systems are explained in more detail in another video.
Now let’s walk through the full process.
Let’s begin with this crank arm by removing the crank arm bolt.
As always, when we work we should consider our body position and our hand and wrench position.
This is good mechanical advantage.
If I happened to have gone here, that’s very poor mechanical advantage.
I can always spin things around and find different ways to hold.
Now I’m ready to loosen counterclockwise.
The bolt comes out…
and we should always look inside in case a washer was left behind.
Pull this washer out. It must come out before any crank extractor goes in.
The bolt that we’ve removed is going to let you determine the style of tool that’s going to remove the crank.
The smaller 8mm bolts – about the size of a pencil use the small driver foot of the CCP-22
or the small foot on the CWP-7 to safely push against the end of the spindle.
The larger bolts of the Octalink or ISIS Drive use the larger foot of the CCP-44
or the large foot option on the CWP-7 to safely push against the spindle of their system.
This was the bolt that we removed from the bike – let’s get the tool and get to work.
In our case we want to back up the driver fairly even with the threaded coupler.
Now we are going to install and screw in the threaded coupler,
making sure it’s not cross-threaded in the crank arm as we do so.
Screw it down by hand all the way
it’s also a good to get a little extra pressure there
to make sure we have full thread engagement of the threaded coupler.
For the nut-style spindles, the crank is held on with the nut.
Notice the spindle protrudes past the flat in the crank.
Make sure the spindle driver is well backed up into the threaded coupler
so that you get full thread engagement of the coupler into the crank.
We’re now ready to turn the spindle driver downward until we feel it contact the end of the spindle.
Here again, think about your good mechanical advantage – move the wrench as you need
and your hands until feels more comfortable and begin pressing.
Little bits at a time are fine – we are walking the crank off the spindle.
Keep going – it’s eventually going to get easier and easier and now almost ready
It is coming off by hand and we will repeat the process on the other side.
Installation should begin with surface preparation.
Anti-sieze or grease should always be applied to the threads of the bolt. This helps that pull up fully tight.
Greasing the spindle service is also an option especially if you’re in an area of corrosion and rust.
What keeps cranks from creaking, however, is tension from the bolt.
When installing the arm, check the fitting on the spindle that it is correctly clocked to the fitting on the arm.
Slide the arm in place and now thread in the bolt.
Correct tension is very important for the three piece crank.
Manufacturers’ recommendations go from 30 Newton meters to 45 Newton meters – a very wide range.
This is why a torque wrench is always appropriate.
Consider your mechanical advantage and begin working the bolt all the way in.
The wrench has clicked – we’re now at full torque for this brand
this crank is fully installed.
If you’re using a hand wrench, you’re going to have to use what’s called perceived torque
or the amount of effort you’re putting on that wrench.
Here I am holding the ranch about 10 inches from the bolt.
This is a 350 inch pound recommended torque – that is about 35 pounds of effort on this wrench
so I am giving it a good healthy push to be fully tight.
Thread preparation is repeated on the opposite side.
The arm is placed 180 degrees from the first arm installed. The crank arm bolt is installed.
This side will be pulled equal torque to the first side.
And those are the basic procedures for removing and installing the three piece crank.
For more information visit the repair help section of parktool.com. Thank you for joining us.

Bestseller No. 1
Park Tool CWP-7 Compact Universal Bicycle Crank Puller – Square Taper and Splined 3-Piece Cranksets
  • Universal tool for removing crank arms from any bicycle with 3-piece crank system
  • Fits crank arms with square tapered and splined spindle interfaces
  • Compatible systems include Shimano Octalink, ISIS Drive, SRAM PowerSpline, and Bosch BNI e-bikes
  • Strong rotating tip system ensures smooth operation and long life
  • Made in the USA

Bike Crank Puller Review

A bicycle crank puller is a valuable tool to have. You will need it to fix or replace your bicycle crank, the crank being the spindle that runs from the pedal crank to the wheel hub. Without this tool the crank would simply break and you would have a very difficult time getting your bicycle in or out of the garage or driveway. The tool is also useful when attaching the pedals to the seat. You will want one sturdy enough to handle the weight of all of the pedals combined.

There are several types of bicycle crank puller that you can purchase. One type is the screwdriver type. This type of bicycle crank puller has a long thin arm with a head on one end and a tail on the other. You thread the spindle through the hole in the seat using the arm of the bicycle crank puller and twist the handle a little to loosen and then tighten the nut on the spindle. On the other end of the bicycle crank puller the spindle is drawn back into the crank and the bicycle is ready for a ride.

Another type of bicycle crank puller is the cable puller. This type of bicycle crank puller is similar to the wrench but instead of pulling the bicycle back into the garage or house you push it forward. The advantage to this technique is that you can pull your bicycle in relatively tight places. The disadvantage is that you will need to be able to get down under the seat and out of the bicycle seat before the bicycle will be properly loosened and ready to ride.

A bicycle crank puller that is designed for use in older bicycles is known as an antique style bicycle puller. These tools have a much longer arm than the modern day bicycle crank puller. They will usually have a large number of teeth. An antique style bicycle crank puller will usually have a handle bar that will enable you to make a comfortable seating position while working on an older bicycles.

There are many different types of bicycle tools. You can purchase tools that fit your specific purpose. Some people prefer to own more tools than they actually need, since the cost of owning more tools is often lower than the cost of buying replacements. When considering the purchase of a bicycle tool, always keep in mind that the tool and the sprocket are very important to the proper functioning of your bicycle.

It can be very helpful if you take a look at the various kinds of bicycle crank pullers that are available on the market today. There are many different makes and models of bicycle tool that will work best for your bicycle. Once you have decided which type of bicycle crank puller is best for your needs, it will be easier to find the right tool for the job.

Last update on 2021-04-11 / Disclaimer: as an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.